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146th Security Forces participate in combative fighting arts training

146th Airlift Wing Security Forces personnel train with weapons during a combat training course in the maintenance hangar at the 146th Airlift Wing ANGS, May 5, 2013. (Air National Guard photo by: Senior Airman Nicholas Carzis.)

146th Airlift Wing Security Forces personnel train with weapons during a combat training course in the maintenance hangar at the 146th Airlift Wing ANGS, May 5, 2013. (Air National Guard photo by: Senior Airman Nicholas Carzis.)

Mike DeLio instructs 146th Airlift Wing Security Forces personnel in weapons combat training in the maintenance hangar at the 146th Airlift Wing ANGS, May 5, 2013. (Air National Guard photo by: Senior Airman Nicholas Carzis.)

Mike DeLio instructs 146th Airlift Wing Security Forces personnel in weapons combat training in the maintenance hangar at the 146th Airlift Wing ANGS, May 5, 2013. (Air National Guard photo by: Senior Airman Nicholas Carzis.)

CHANNEL ISLANDS AIR NATIONAL GUARD STATION, Calif. -- Members from the 146th Security Forces Squadron (SFS) recently conducted a four-hour war skills training in combative techniques. Lead by instructor Mike DeLio and his trainers from Combative Fighting Arts, a company that specializes in teaching tactical hand-to-hand combat, the Security Forces personnel were tasked with training objectives that would help them survive life or death close combat scenarios.

"The bumps and bruises that we have today will help us grow stronger for the battles tomorrow," said DeLio as the trainees listened in a circle around him with excitement visible within the group.

DeLio, a sergeant in the California State Military Reserves, began by demonstrating his techniques, and the SFS mirrored his moves. Each participant held a rubber covered knife to practice with, and DeLio explained in detail exactly what the technique is used for while demonstrating the movements at the same time.

The hands-on training changed from demonstration to execution as groups were split into two-person teams. DeLio blew a whistle and the maintenance hangar erupted into close quarters combat. Every participant had eyes on their attacker, exchanging blows with the practice knife.

In the midst of the noise and training a knife was dropped, just as it might in the chaos of combat. DeLio blew the whistle again--this time it was the signal that someone must pay for losing their weapon. The individual at fault must drop to push-up position and start pushing and immediately after, other participants were allowed to attack the individual with their practice knife. DeLio reminded all participants that these consequences merely represented the actual possible fatal consequences of dropping one's weapon during combat.

The training continued with blocking, paring, trapping, stabbing, thrusting, slashing techniques, footwork, combinations, and countering methods, all covered in detail. As step-by-step exercises of the various techniques and practice drills went on, the participants executed them with practical and reality- based methods, enabling them to get the feel of an actual knife-fight attack and the defense measures needed to win.

"Winning means survival. The bottom line is to protect our freedom, our nation, our communities from these bad guys that want to see us fall," said SFS Chief Master Sgt. Steve Timbol. "I agree with Mike's mind set...at the end of the day...get home to your loved ones, no matter what it takes."

146th Security Forces participate in combative fighting arts training

146th Airlift Wing Security Forces personnel train with weapons during a combat training course in the maintenance hangar at the 146th Airlift Wing ANGS, May 5, 2013. (Air National Guard photo by: Senior Airman Nicholas Carzis.)

146th Airlift Wing Security Forces personnel train with weapons during a combat training course in the maintenance hangar at the 146th Airlift Wing ANGS, May 5, 2013. (Air National Guard photo by: Senior Airman Nicholas Carzis.)

Mike DeLio instructs 146th Airlift Wing Security Forces personnel in weapons combat training in the maintenance hangar at the 146th Airlift Wing ANGS, May 5, 2013. (Air National Guard photo by: Senior Airman Nicholas Carzis.)

Mike DeLio instructs 146th Airlift Wing Security Forces personnel in weapons combat training in the maintenance hangar at the 146th Airlift Wing ANGS, May 5, 2013. (Air National Guard photo by: Senior Airman Nicholas Carzis.)

CHANNEL ISLANDS AIR NATIONAL GUARD STATION, Calif. -- Members from the 146th Security Forces Squadron (SFS) recently conducted a four-hour war skills training in combative techniques. Lead by instructor Mike DeLio and his trainers from Combative Fighting Arts, a company that specializes in teaching tactical hand-to-hand combat, the Security Forces personnel were tasked with training objectives that would help them survive life or death close combat scenarios.

"The bumps and bruises that we have today will help us grow stronger for the battles tomorrow," said DeLio as the trainees listened in a circle around him with excitement visible within the group.

DeLio, a sergeant in the California State Military Reserves, began by demonstrating his techniques, and the SFS mirrored his moves. Each participant held a rubber covered knife to practice with, and DeLio explained in detail exactly what the technique is used for while demonstrating the movements at the same time.

The hands-on training changed from demonstration to execution as groups were split into two-person teams. DeLio blew a whistle and the maintenance hangar erupted into close quarters combat. Every participant had eyes on their attacker, exchanging blows with the practice knife.

In the midst of the noise and training a knife was dropped, just as it might in the chaos of combat. DeLio blew the whistle again--this time it was the signal that someone must pay for losing their weapon. The individual at fault must drop to push-up position and start pushing and immediately after, other participants were allowed to attack the individual with their practice knife. DeLio reminded all participants that these consequences merely represented the actual possible fatal consequences of dropping one's weapon during combat.

The training continued with blocking, paring, trapping, stabbing, thrusting, slashing techniques, footwork, combinations, and countering methods, all covered in detail. As step-by-step exercises of the various techniques and practice drills went on, the participants executed them with practical and reality- based methods, enabling them to get the feel of an actual knife-fight attack and the defense measures needed to win.

"Winning means survival. The bottom line is to protect our freedom, our nation, our communities from these bad guys that want to see us fall," said SFS Chief Master Sgt. Steve Timbol. "I agree with Mike's mind set...at the end of the day...get home to your loved ones, no matter what it takes."